Wireless Dog Fence

 

 

  PetSafe PIF-300 Fence

PetSafe PIF-300 Review Wireless Dog Fence

Petsafe Stay and Play

PetSafe Stay And Play Wireless Fence

Perimeter WiFi Dog Fence

Perimeter WiFi Dog Fence

 
     
Overall Rating
Correction Levels 5 5 8
Beep-Only Setting Yes Yes Yes
Signal Reliability Very good Very good Good
Max. Dogs Unlimited Unlimited 2
Coverage 1/2 acre (180 ft. diameter) 3/4 acre (210 ft. diameter) 2.5 acres
Receiver Battery 6 volt battery (2-3 months) Rechargeable Rechargeable
Collar Neck Size 6" - 23" 6" - 23" 14" - 26"
Min. Dog Weight 8 lbs. 5 lbs. 20 lbs.
Min. Dog Age 6 months 6 months 6 months
Training Flags Provided 50 50 50
Transmitter Measurements 9” (L) x 9.1” (W) x 8.9“ (D) 6.4 (L) x 6.8″ (W) x 6.1″ (D) 12.1″ (L) x 6.5″ (W) x 1.2″ (D)
Warranty Lifetime (Limited) Lifetime (Limited) Lifetime (Limited)
Water Resistance (Collar) Water-proof Water-proof Water-proof

 

 

 

  Extreme Dog Fence

Extreme Dog Fence

SportDog Dog Fence

SportDog Dog Fence

PetSafe YardMax Dog Fence

PetSafe YardMax Dog Fence

 
     
Overall Rating
Correction Levels 5 5 5
Beep-Only Setting Yes Yes Yes
Signal Reliability Excellent Very good Very good
Max. Dogs Unlimited Unlimited Unlimited
Coverage 5 acres 100 acres 5 acres
Receiver Battery Disposable 6-Volt Disposable 9-Volt Rechargable
Collar Neck Size 6" - 23" 14" - 26"" 6" - 23"
Min. Dog Weight 8 lbs. 20 lbs. 10 lbs.
Min. Dog Age 6 months 6 months 6 months
Training Flags Provided 50 100 50
Warranty Extended 3 Year Parts Lifetime (Limited) Lifetime (Limited)
Water Resistance (Collar) Water-proof Water-proof Water-proof
Country of Origin United States China China

 

 

 

Wired Pet Containment Systems

Here is how a wired pet containment system works. You encircle your property with dog fence wire, burying it just a few inches deep. This wire becomes your dog’s boundary that they learn not to cross. An antenna signal runs through the dog fence wire. Your dog fence transmitter is hooked up to the wire, which transmits a radio signal throughout. Your dog wears a special receiver collar. Should the dog approach the wire, the collar picks up the radio signal and causes a corrective stimulation to be delivered to the dog, through contact points on the dog’s collar. In the beginning, flags around your property provide a visual cue to reinforce to your dog where he or she cannot cross. After a bit of training from you, combined with learning through the static correction, your dog learns to stay within the boundaries.

The main advantage of a wired system is that you have the flexibility to lay the boundary exactly where you want it to be. You are able to customize your boundary to your own individual property. The enclosed area can be large or small, and can be in any shape you desire. In addition to this, you can also create no-go zones within your enclosed area, if you want to protect a flowerbed or other structure for example.

Wireless Pet Containment Systems

Now, let’s talk about a wireless pet containment system. Although the concept is the same, instead of customizing your border exactly where you want it to be, your wireless boundary exists in the form of a circle. The only control you have over the boundary is how large or small your containment circle will be. Although this works for some properties, it doesn’t work as well for others. For example, if your property is rectangular, a circular field won’t allow your dog to have access to your entire yard.

With that being said, the main advantage of a wireless dog fence is that it is effortless to install. With no wires to bury, all you do is plug it in, set the size of your circle and put the collar on your dog.

Another aspect to consider is reliability. With a wireless dog fence, there are several situations which can cause the signal to be unreliable. These include sloping on your property, too many trees, stucco siding on your home and a metal roof. In contrast, none of these situations will cause any problems with a wired dog fence.

 

Lightning Protection
Whether your pet containment system is wired or wireless, both operate through the generation of electronic radio fields. With wired, this signal travels through the wire. With wireless, the invisible signal radiates from the transmitter. In both cases, the dog fence transmitter is connected to your home’s AC current. This means in either case, your system may be vulnerable to power surges.
Should your system be struck by lightning, without lightning protection, the transmitter may become permanently damaged and rendered useless. This means your dog will be left unprotected. This is why connecting your system to a quality lightning surge protector is highly recommended.

Battery Backup
A majority of pet containment systems do not offer battery backup to support the system during a power outage. If you are concerned about this happening, you can just pick up a battery backup that you would use to connect to a computer for example, to provide backup power to your dog fence.

Audible Warning
Every one of the dog fences we sell provide an audible warning if the fence is no longer operational. If an audible warning is heard on the transmitter, this always means there is a problem. In most cases, it means there is a break somewhere in your wire. Because your wire must always be in a closed loop back to your transmitter, any break in the wire will cause the fence to fail. Should you find you have a wire break, troubleshooting your system with a wire break detector will let you know exactly where the wire has broken.

 

 

 

Wireless Systems

Installing With a Single Transmitter

  • Plug in your dog fence transmitter inside your home. Keep in mind that wherever your transmitter is located, this becomes the center of your containment circle.
  • Set the radius of your circle to your desired setting. The amount of land you can contain, varies from one system to another. In general, a wireless dog fence won’t allow you to contain more than 1 acre of land.

 

 

Installing With Multiple Wireless Transmitters

  • Begin by plugging your dog fence transmitters in separate faraway locations in your home. If you place them next to each other, this will do nothing to enlarge your containment area.
  • The concept is that you are creating two containment circles, which will overlap each other in a figure 8 fashion. Your dog will not become corrected within this area, even where the circles intersect with each other.
  • Set the desired radius on each wireless dog fence transmitter to establish your containment area
Wireless System -- Multiple Transmitters

 

 

 

 

Underground Systems

Begin by choosing the layout that works best for what you are trying to accomplish. Use our dog fence layout information shown below to help with this. Before burying the wire, test the system to make sure there is a complete loop back to the transmitter, which is the only way the fence will function. A complete loop is created with your boundary wire, and then a small length of twisted wire is used to connect your boundary loop to your transmitter, located in your home or other weatherproof location. We will touch more on the subject of twisted wire later.

Some people are concerned that burying the wire will be a task that is too big for them to accomplish. However, it is easier than you might think. Begin by using a shovel to slice open the soil a bit. The wire only needs to go down an inch or two. After placing the wire in the crack, just brush the dirt back over the seam. You can also use a wire trencher if you like. A wire trencher will create the trench and place the wire inside of it at the same time.

 

 

Basic Installation: Enclosing Both Your Front and Backyard

To connect this loop to your dog fence transmitter located indoors, you will need to use twisted wire. When 2 dog fence wires are twisted together, the signal becomes neutral, and will not correct your dog for crossing over it. Our ProGrade Dog Fence Kits come complete with 50 feet of twisted wire, which is enough for most situations. You can also choose to make your own if you desire. You just need to make sure there is at least 1 twist per inch.

You may be wondering what to do if you need the wire to cross a sidewalk or paved driveway. Here are several options for handling this:

  • Many driveways have existing expansion cracks, or seams already present. Simply insert the wire inside of the seam that is already there.
  • If you have an existing drainage pipe under the driveway, you can run the wire through it. With that being said, you have to be careful of how deep the existing pipe is. This is because if your dog fence wire goes as low as 3 feet into the ground, the signal will cancel out and your dog won’t receive a correction in that area.
  • You can use a circular saw or masonry blade to cut a groove in your driveway. Then after inserting the dog fence wire, you can just put some heavy caulking over it in the groove.
Basic Installation -- Front and Back Yard

 

 

The Double Loop Method: For Containing the Front or Backyard Only

Since your dog fence wire must be in a continuous loop in order for your fence to function, how can you contain only your backyard without having to circle in front of your house? The answer is the double loop method. Here is how you can accomplish this.

Begin the wire at the transmitter, and end it at the transmitter. Run your perimeter loop around your property. To keep the loop continuous, double the wire, running it parallel to the wire you just placed down. It is important to keep at least 4 feet between the parallel wires, or else the signal will cancel itself out.

Double Loop Installation -- Back Yard Only

 

 

The Over the House Method: For Containing the Front or Backyard Only

Perhaps you want to avoid having to double loop your dog fence wire in order to only contain your front or backyard. Here is one way to do that, although we admittedly don’t recommend this layout. The reason for this is because the signal can potentially “spill” into the bordering areas inside of your home. This can cause your dog’s collar to be activated when he or she is indoors.

Run the wire up and over your house, using the gutters and downspouts. Continue the loop on the ground until you have created your containment circle.

The Over the House Method: For Containing the Front or Backyard Only

 

 

Blocking Off an Entrance/Exit to a Gate, Only

Perhaps you already have a physical fence installed, and you just need to stop your dogs from going in and out of an opening in the fence. Here is how you can accomplish that.

  • Create an oblong circle (allowing a complete circuit) with your dog fence wire. It should be stretched out so that it is a bit larger than the area you wish to block.
  • Connect this loop you have created with the transmitter in your home, by using twisted dog fence wire. Since twisted wire is neutral, your dog won’t receive a correction when they cross over it.

 

Will your small loop need to cross over your driveway or sidewalk? Here is a refresher on what to do about that.

  • Many driveways have existing expansion cracks, or seams already present. Simply insert the wire inside of the seam that is already there.
  • If you have an existing drainage pipe under the driveway, you can run the wire through it. With that being said, you have to be careful of how deep the existing pipe is. This is because if your dog fence wire goes as low as 3 feet into the ground, the signal will cancel out and your dog won’t receive a correction in that area.
  • You can use a circular saw or masonry blade to cut a groove in your driveway. Then after inserting the dog fence wire, you can just put some heavy caulking over it in the groove.
Blocking Off an Entrance/Exit to a Gate, Only

 

 

Installing to Reinforce Your Existing Physical Fence

Is your dog able to get out of your physical fence? This is a very common situation. Determined dogs will dig under a physical fence, or try to propel themselves over it. Your dog ends up getting out of your yard, and into the dangers of the outside world. How can you remedy this? By reinforcing your physical fence with an electric dog fence. Your dog won’t be able to go under or over the wire, without receiving a correction. In turn, your dog is likely to begin distancing himself from the physical fence altogether.

  • You need to have a double loop of wire protecting your fence, since you won’t be circling the front of your home.
  • Run the wire around the entire top of your fence. Keeping a continuous wire, bring it to the bottom of the fence and run it along the bottom. Both ends will meet up at the location of the transmitter.
Installing to Reinforce Your Existing Physical Fence

 

 

Waterfront Limited Water Access

Perhaps you have a waterfront property, and you would like your dog to be able to enter the lake behind your home. What you can do, is run your dog fence wire directly into the water.

  • Make sure your dog fence kit includes quality 14-gauge dog fence wire, which will have no issues being submerged and will not become damaged in a wet environment.
  • Loop your boundary wire around the front and back of your home, including in the lake itself, marking the point where you don’t want your dog to swim out any further.
  • Use fishing sinkers or bricks to sink the wire in the water. However, keep in mind that if the wire is more than 10 feet deep, the signal will not reach the surface and the dog will not get corrected when crossing over the location of the wire. This obviously isn’t an issue if you are not concerned about your dog swimming out too far.
Waterfront Limited Water Access

 

 

One Sided Open-Ended Exit and Entrance

Some people need to have part of their fence neutral, so that their dog can enter and exit at in a specific area. For example, there may be a lake that you want your dog to be able to freely access. This open-ended layout helps you to accomplish this.

  • Begin by creating a double loop around 3 sides of your property that you want to contain. Be sure to keep at least 4 feet between the parallel wires.
  • For the area where you want your dog to cross, you use a length of twisted wire instead.
  • Keep in mind that after your dog is done swimming, he will only be able to enter back in the fence at the area of twisted wire you have designated.
One Sided Open-Ended Exit and Entrance

 

 

 

 

 

To begin with, your dog should be at least 6 months old, and be able to obey basic commands, such as come, sit and stay.

Some people assume that all they need to do is put the transmitter collar on their dog, and their dog will figure the whole thing out. That unfortunately won’t work. Since the fence is invisible, your dog will need some guidance, in the form of training. If your dog doesn’t understand how the fence works, he may not want to go into the yard at all, or may be afraid to move freely within the yard. Although your pet containment system is safe and humane, it won’t work without training from you. Here are some basics to keep in mind while training.

  • • Before you activate the dog’s receiver collar, allow him or her to wear the collar for 3-5 days. This lets the dog get used to the collar. The idea is for the dog to associate the correction with the boundary itself, as opposed to the collar.
  • • The receiver collar must be fitted snugly against your dog’s skin. Ideally, you should only be able to get one finger between the probes on the collar and the skin on your dog’s neck.
  • • The receiver collar should not be worn more than 12 hours at a time. This is because the dog’s skin can become irritated, causing sores if left on longer than that. For the remaining 12 hours, your dog should be kept indoors or in a kennel.
  • • Place flags around your property, in the location where your dog’s boundary exists. This gives your dog a visual cue/reminder that the boundary exists there. These flags can be removed after about a month.
  • • Visit our Complete Online Training Guide for More Specific Instructions

 

Creating an “Invisible Gate”

What can you do when you want your dog to be able to leave the perimeter when you want him to? Here is how to create a space where he can comfortably exit without fear.

  • Remove the dog’s receiver collar, or deactivate the system.
  • Select a specific spot on the perimeter, where you will go to every time you want your dog to exit.
  • The receiver collar should not be worn more than 12 hours at a time. This is because the dog’s skin can become irritated, causing sores if left on longer than that. For the remaining 12 hours, your dog should be kept indoors or in a kennel.
  • Place flags around your property, in the location where your dog’s boundary exists. This gives your dog a visual cue/reminder that the boundary exists there. These flags can be removed after about a month.
  • Visit our Complete Online Training Guide for More Specific Instructions

 

 

 

 

1. How old does my dog need to be before using a pet containment system?

Answer: 6 months old is a good rule of thumb. Your dog should be able to obey basic commands.

2. After determining the system is functioning properly, what if the dog is ignoring the boundary?

Answer: The dog needs more training. Retrain the dog by putting it on a long leash. Once the dog feels the correction, pull him out of the correction area and redirected to sit and stay.

3. After the dog has been trained, how can I take him out of the boundary when I need to?

Answer: Create an “Invisible Gate,” following the steps outlined in the section above.

4. What if my dog keeps running through the fence at one specific spot?

Answer: Begin by walking him to this location on a long leash. Have someone else walk by that spot, perhaps with their dog. When your dog tries to leave, pull him back and redirect him to sit and stay.

5. What is the “dummy collar” effect?

Answer: this is when the dog wears the collar for 3-7 days without it being activated. This will cause the dog to associate the correction with the boundary, and not with the collar itself.

6. Should the dog be on or off the leash when corrected for the first time?

Answer: On the leash. This will allow you to redirect your dog when they decide to cross the boundary.

7. How long do the flags need to remain in the yard, marking the boundary?

Answer: For at least 2 weeks, but up to 30 days if necessary.

8. What is the “safe zone?

Answer: This is the area in your yard that your dog can safely roam within, without receiving a correction.

9. What if one of my dogs likes to chew on the other dog’s collar?

Answer: When you see your dog doing this, pull him off, and redirect the dog to sit and stay.

10. Is this form of pet containment humane?

Answer: Absolutely. Although the sensation of a static correction is uncomfortable to the dog, it does not harm him or her.